LAKE WORTH, FL. — Last month the Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) was acknowledged by two prestigious statewide organizations due to our efforts to provide quality workforce housing in the City of Lake Worth. On October 30th, the Lake Worth CRA Consortium was named a Best Practice Award Finalist from Sustainable Florida for our recent endeavor to provide over 100 new affordable housing units within a three year timeframe. Sustainable Florida advances the vision of sustainability by identifying, supporting and communicating best management practices — those which protect and preserve Florida’s environment while building markets for Florida’s businesses by enhancing their competitive advantages today. An independent set of judge reviewed and scored numerous nominations. Judges were experienced and knowledgeable in the fields of sustainability, energy, engineering, green building, corporate social responsibility and government.

In addition, and for the third consecutive year, the CRA was recognized by the Florida Redevelopment Association (FRA) for another outstanding redevelopment achievement. The FRA presents awards annually to projects that exhibit the best practices in Florida redevelopment over the past year. The winners were announced this year during FRA’s 2013 Annual Conference held in Tampa on October 31st. Each year the FRA awards committee carefully selects the winners from dozens of entries submitted by agencies from across the State of Florida. All of the entries embody the spirit of successful community redevelopment and revitalization.

This year, the Lake Worth CRA earned the award for “Outstanding Affordable Housing Project” as a result of the multi-million dollar Urban Arts Lofts project which was completed in February 2013. The Urban Arts Lofts is a new 12- unit live/work development constructed in the heart of downtown Lake Worth. The Urban Arts Lofts is considered a signature project in the City and will act as a catalyst for the development of a true arts and cultural destination. The project was built using funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act meant to clean up abandoned and foreclosed properties in our most economically distressed neighborhoods. In addition to providing quality housing and workspace for artists, this project will significantly increase the local tax-base and provide much needed revenue for the City’s General fund.

The CRA recognizes that these projects would not have been possible without the help received from our numerous community partners including: The Urban Group, Adopt-A-Family of the Palm Beaches, Housing Leadership Council of Palm Beach, Housing Partnership, Habitat for Humanity of Palm Beach County, the City of Lake Worth and the Neighborhood Stabilization Program from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

For more information about either awards program please call the Lake Worth CRA office at (561) 493-2550 or visit: www.lakeworthcra.org ; www.lakeworthnsp.org ; www.sustainableflorida.org ; www.redevelopment.net.

Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency received a Bronze Excellence in Economic Development Award for its 2012 project in the category of Neighborhood Development for communities with populations of 25,000 – 200,000 from the International Economic Development Council (IEDC).

The honor was presented at an awards ceremony on Tuesday, October 8, during the IEDC Annual Conference, which was held October 6-9, in Philadelphia, Penn.

“The Excellence in Economic Development Awards recognize Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency as being one of the leading organizations in the industry for innovation, creativity and successful strategies,” said IEDC chair, Paul Krutko. “These awards are meant to honor the organizations and individuals who are dedicated to making a positive change in their communities. This organization uses creative solutions and inventive ideas, and offers other regions a wonderful example to learn and benefit from. The award represents an acknowledgment and appreciation for Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency’s dedication to continuous growth within itself, as well as improving the industry overall.”

The Lake Worth NSP-2 Consortium undertook a significant housing redevelopment effort, beginning in 2010. With just over $23M from the federal government through the Neighborhood Stabilization Grant, the CRA, as lead agency, put together a team of almost twenty partners that together, acquired foreclosed, dilapidated property in a very specific and targeted area of the City, completed substantial rehabilitation on the homes and then sold or rented the units to income qualified families or individuals.

While creating this comprehensive implementation plan, careful thought and consideration was given to providing a complete program of stability and self-sufficiency. Classes and opportunities were incorporated into the program, such as budgeting, credit counseling and individual deposit accounts were offered to help people save. Training was also offered for residents at the local community college.

The CRA was responsible for purchasing all the properties for the program and conveyed most to partners, while keeping 20 for development by the CRA. In conjunction with another CRA program, called LULA – Lake Worth Arts, the CRA focused on a specific group of individuals to help revitalize the area – artists. By integrating arts and arts-related activities into the stabilization plan, the local arts community was able to not only participate but grow in strength and numbers, providing additional opportunities for artists to live and practice their craft. “The development of the 12 unit, Arts Lofts have really helped transform the area just west of Dixie Highway and opened the door to many more exciting projects,” says Joan Oliva, CRA Executive Director, “Approximately 100 new units have been built in the CRA area and another 60 are under construction thanks to the NSP-2 program and its partners.”

The project also paid close attention to the CRA’s commitment to the environment and embraced not only cost cutting improvements to benefit the homeowners but environmentally sensitive materials, appliances and methods, leading to green certification.

IEDC’s Excellence in Economic Development Awards recognize the world’s best economic development programs and partnerships, marketing materials, and the year’s most influential leaders. These awards honor organizations and individuals for their efforts in creating positive change in urban, suburban, and rural communities.

About the International Economic Development Council

The International Economic Development Council (IEDC) is a non-profit membership organization serving economic developers. With more than 4,000 members, IEDC is the largest organization of its kind. Economic developers promote economic well-being and quality of life for their communities, by creating, retaining and expanding jobs that facilitate growth, enhance wealth and provide a stable tax base. From public to private, rural to urban, and local to international, IEDC’s members are engaged in the full range of economic development experience. Given the breadth of economic development work, our members are employed in a wide variety of settings including local, state, provincial and federal governments, public private partnerships, chambers of commerce, universities and a variety of other institutions. When we succeed, our members create high-quality jobs, develop vibrant communities, and improve the quality of life in their regions. www.iedconline.org

The Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) will be hosting a ribbon cutting ceremony for the new Urban Arts Lofts (UAL) project this Friday, August 9, 2013. The UAL is a community redevelopment project consisting of 12 two-story, owner occupied live/work lofts located in the heart of the City of Lake Worth. The three essential elements of this project include: Style, Sustainability & Affordability.

The goal of the UAL is to provide workspace along with affordable housing. The development of this distinctive project showcases the talent of its residents while also setting the standard for quality housing within the City. The proximity of these particular units to the downtown and businesses along Lake & Lucerne Avenues helps to form a better synergy between the east and west commercial areas of both Avenues.

This project was made possible courtesy of the $23.2M Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP-2) grant from the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The Federal grant funds, which were used to acquire, plan, design and construct this development, were obtained to specifically rehabilitate or build new homes on foreclosed, abandoned & vacant properties. The Lake Worth CRA also chose to ensure that this new construction project would be Florida Green Building Certified (FGBC).

This development is located in an already sustainable and walk-able area, close to downtown stores, services and public transportation.

The Urban Arts Lofts would not have been successful without the perseverance of the CRA, City of Lake Worth and our NSP-2 Consortium partners.

The ribbon cutting ceremony will take place at 10:00am at the northwest corner of “F” Street and Lucerne Avenue. The public and members of the media are invited to attend this event. Parking is available along all side streets.

Nick and Ashley Nardone, standing on the balcony of their new loft, are the first owners of one of the 12 artist townhouses on Lucerne Avenue. The lofts were built as live-work spaces, with studios downstairs. “We have been here about two and half weeks,” said Nick. “We want to do it really neat and industrial.” Said Ashley: “I never thought I would have studio space. It is a dream.” Photo: Bruce Bennett
After years of planning, artists are moving into the Urban Arts Lofts – a dozen townhouses along Lucerne Avenue and North F Street that were built for artists with living space upstairs and ground-floor studios.

Nick and Ashley Nardone, just married in January, moved to Lake Worth from Broward County in early June to become the first owners of an artist loft. They paid $137,000 for their two-bedroom, 2.5-bath loft, which they say will fit their creative lifestyles perfectly.

Nick Nardone, 26, is a bass guitarist and a technician with the Apple store in Boca Raton. Ashley Nardone, 27, designs and builds displays for the Anthropologie store in Boca Raton. She’s also a photographer, graphic designer, screen printer and music video producer.

The Nardones built their own furniture for their wedding using scrap wood. A table in their downstairs studio space consists of a discarded door attached to legs made from wood scraps and parts of an old bed frame.

“We’re always working on stuff, learning things,” Nick Nardone said. “We pride ourselves on not having cable or TV.”

The Nardones plan to set up a small photo studio, a music practice space and a work bench for assembling creative works in the ground-floor studio space of their loft.

They’re looking forward to doing creative projects with friends Curtis and Annie Spoerlein, owners of the custom furniture shop Maestria Decor on North Dixie Highway. The Spoerleins are buying an Art Deco-style loft just south of the Nardones.

The Spoerleins say they plan to build the furniture for their new townhome and invite some customers upstairs to see their work.

“It’s a dream come true for us,” Curtis Spoerlein said, noting that he and his wife moved to South Florida from Chicago three years ago. “When we came to Lake Worth, we wanted a place where we could live and work.”

The Spoerleins plan to keep their garage-like studio on North Dixie Highway, but they plan to bring work home to the downstairs studio of their loft from time to time.

“We’re the type of people who, if we wake up at 3 in the morning and want to do some work, we will,” Curtis Spoerlein said.

The Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency built the artist lofts using money from a $23.2 million federal Neighborhood Stabilization Program grant. The townhomes for artists are part of the CRA’s long-term plan to use art as a redevelopment tool.

The artist lofts are expected to help the city achieve its goal of expanding the downtown west of Dixie Highway.

To further the creation of an arts hub west of Dixie Highway, the CRA also is applying for a state grant to renovate the shuffleboard building, just east of the new artist lofts, as an art center.

City officials also are considering art-related uses for a city building on F Street north of Lucerne Avenue and for a former beer warehouse donated to the city on Second Avenue South.

WANT A LOFT?

Townhomes at Lucerne Avenue and F Street in Lake Worth are still being sold to artists as live/work spaces. Buyers must prove they are artists and meet income guidelines to buy one of the lofts. To download an application form, go to www.lakeworthnsp.org. For information, call the Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency at 561-493-2550

The Coral Springs Italian restaurant Tavolino Della Nonna first opened aiming to pay homage to the memory of sitting around grandmother’s table to eat her homecooked meals. It even has a special corner filled with black-and-white family photos.

In the middle of that corner is a dining table, and a 1940s oven and sink line one of the walls. Re-runs of “I Love Lucy” silently play on a monitor screen.

Now, owner Edward Pozzuoli wants things to get a bit louder.

The West Sample Road restaurant recently expanded, nearly doubling its size to add a bar and dimly lit lounge for live music performances and stand-up comedy nights. Cocktail tables are scattered throughout, two large screens loop black-and-white videos of musical performances, and a saxophone hangs from a wall.

Steps away is the dining area that opened in 2007. It’s sound-proof to block any undesired music from the lounge.

“It’s all a matter of the old and new and blending them together,” Pozzuoli said of his 6,500-square-foot restaurant.

The new portion, “Tavolino Della Notte” or as Pozzuoli translates, “Little Table of the Night,” livens up the up-scale establishment while still honoring the concept of grandma’s table, he said.

“We don’t want to forget our loyal customers, first and foremost,” Pozzuoli said, as he routinely excused himself to hug and shake hands with customers who approached him to say goodbye after their meals.

“We want to grow together to make it right,” he said.

Coral Springs resident Rose Colbacchini said that for three years in a row, her bowling league “Coffee Cups” has been celebrating the end of the bowling season at Pozzuoli’s restaurant. This season, the group of nearly 30 ladies reserved the lounge area.

“We’ll be back next year,” said Colbacchini, 74. “It’s a special place.”

Pozzuoli said the Copacabana-like lounge is the third component his Coral Springs business needed to be successful.

“Great food, great service and great atmosphere,” he said. “When all those are working together, it’s like having the fifth Beatle, a je ne sais quoi, the home-field advantage.”

Pozzuoli’s vision of how he wanted to upgrade the restaurant helped in the development process, said Edward Cannatelli of Pompano Beach-based Cannatelli Builders Inc., which completed the project.

“It’s always nice when a client is very excited about his project. A lot of times it turns into friendship,” Cannatelli said at Pozzuoli’s restaurant. “Like this one.”

The new space took about five months and was completed toward the end of 2012, Cannatelli said.

Pozzuoli said his business, like many others, took a hit during the Great Recession. At one point he thought of selling the restaurant, but opted for investing in it instead because he believed they were still delivering quality service.

“Even in difficult times, people still enjoy quality,” he said. “That’s what we aim for.”

Tavolino Della Nonna is at 10181 W. Sample Road, east of Coral Springs Drive. It’s open weekdays from 11 a.m. to 1 a.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 4 p.m. to 1 a.m. Reservations are encouraged.

For the entertainment line-up, go to tavolinorestaurant.com
mvalverde@tribune.com, 954-356-4526 or Twitter @MiriamValverde

Copyright © 2013, South Florida Sun-Sentinel

LAKE WORTH, FL. — Late last week, the National Development Council (NDC) officially announced the semi-finalists for the NDC Academy 2013 Awards. The Lake Worth Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP-2) Consortium is one of six semi-finalists in the Housing Development category. Projects were submitted by communities from across the country.

The fifth biennial NDC Academy is a three-day training and networking event that will take place April 16-18 in Washington, DC. The NDC Academy brings together professionals in economic and housing development from all over the nation. The Academy’s theme is “Delivering Community Results in Difficult Times . . . More Important than Ever.”

The NDC Academy 2013 Awards is a special feature of the Academy which allows attendees to learn about innovative community development projects from the people who made them happen, as well as celebrate the important work done in underserved communities throughout the country. NDC has selected six projects in each category that exemplify work in Creative Financing, Job Creation, Housing Development and Community Development. Voting will take place during the Academy sessions, and attendees will be given the opportunity to vote for the project they believe to be most impactful. One project in each category will be awarded the top honor at an Academy 2013 Awards luncheon on Thursday, April 18.
“Response to the call for projects this year was overwhelming and the quality of projects and work done to improve communities across the nation are truly impressive,” said Robert W. Davenport, President of NDC. “Congratulations to all of our semi-finalists. We are looking forward to the learning more about their projects at the Academy.”

The Project

Beginning in 2010, the Lake Worth NSP-2 Consortium undertook a significant housing redevelopment effort. With just over $23M from the federal government through the Neighborhood Stabilization Grant, the CRA, as lead agency, put together a team of almost twenty partners that together, acquired foreclosed dilapidated property in a very specific and targeted area of the City, completed substantial rehabilitation on the homes and then sold or rented the units to income qualified families or individuals. Main development partners included Adopt-a-Family of the Palm Beaches, Habitat for Humanity of Palm Beach, the Urban Group, the City of Lake Worth, Housing Partnership, Stuart and Shelby, Cannatelli Builders  and Housing Leadership of Palm Beach County. While creating this comprehensive implementation plan, careful thought and consideration was given to providing a complete program of stability and self-sufficiency. Classes and opportunities were incorporated into the program, such as budgeting, credit counseling and individual deposit accounts were offered to help people save. Training was also offered for residents at Palm Beach State College. The CRA was responsible for purchasing all the properties for the program and conveyed most to partners, while keeping 20 for development by the CRA. In conjunction with another CRA program, called LULA – Lake Worth Arts, the CRA focused on a specific group of individuals to help revitalize the area: artists. By integrating arts and arts-related activities into the stabilization plan, the local arts community was able to not only participate but grow in strength and numbers, providing additional opportunities for artists to live and practice their craft. Due to the diverse community, the Consortium took specific efforts to engage people of all ethnic backgrounds. By marketing the program in various languages and in a multitude of ways, the program was able to attract a very diverse and culturally rich mix of new residents. The project also paid close attention to the CRA/ City’s commitment to the environment and embraced not only cost cutting improvements to benefit the homeowners but environmentally sensitive materials, appliances and methods, leading to green certification.

“The City’s rebirth is underway with over 100 new homes and homeowners now experiencing the unique and charming qualities of this City. Nowhere else can you enjoy an authentic downtown, a newly renovated beach  complex, unmatched recreational opportunities, cultural arts and the sense of community that exists in Lake Worth. This was a remarkable opportunity for the CRA, the City and all our committed partners and I hope we can continue to work together and be the catalyst for more positive change here in the City.” says Joan Oliva, Executive Director of the Lake Worth CRA.

“The CRA is honored that such a prestigious organization as the National Development Council would recognize our Neighborhood Stabilization efforts in creating jobs, reconnecting underserved communities and becoming a catalyst for future economic development and investment in the City,” said CRA Board Chair Cary Sabol.

For more information about the Lake Worth CRA and its programs, please call the CRA office at (561) 493-
2550 or visit www.lakeworthcra.org or www.lakeworthnsp.org.

About NDC

The National Development Council is one of the oldest national non-profit community and economic development organizations in the U.S. It was founded in 1969 with one purpose: increasing the flow of capital for investment, jobs and community development to underserved urban and rural areas across the country.

Since that time, NDC has worked with thousands of communities in every one of the 50 states and Puerto Rico, providing technical assistance, professional training, investment in affordable housing, small business financing and direct developer services. Our work has taken many forms, but we have kept pace with the needs of our constituents, adding new programs and services or updating old ones. More information at nationaldevelopmentcouncil.org

LAKE WORTH, FL. — The Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) and the Lake Worth NSP2 Consortium have been recognized by the National League of Cities and the National Black Caucus of Local Elected Officials (NBC-LEO) at the 2013 City Cultural Diversity Awards for the remarkable Lake Worth NSP2 Consortium Affordable Housing Program. The CRA won first place

in the 25,000-100,000 population category. In total, seven cities were honored on March 11th 2013 for implementing programs that enhance and promote cultural diversity in communities. The City Cultural Diversity Awards recognize municipal programs that encourage citizen involvement and show an appreciation of cultural diversity. Cities honored for 2013 are: Fort Worth, Texas; Salt Lake City, Utah; Lake Worth, Florida and Hermiston, Oregon. In addition, three cities were honored as runnersup:
Tempe, AZ; Coral Gables, FL; and District Heights, MD.
The City Cultural Diversity Awards program was established in 1995 by the NBC-LEO to promote cultural diversity in community governance through citizen and community participation. Winning cities are selected from a pool of applicants and are grouped according to population.
In 2009, the Lake Worth NSP2 Consortium (led by the Lake Worth CRA and made up of 20 community based organizations and local companies) was awarded $23.2 million as part of the Neighborhood Stabilization Program grant authorized under the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act. These funds were used to purchase over 100 foreclosed and abandoned properties and provide
rehabilitated or brand new housing to revitalize a culturally diverse area of the city.
“It is always satisfying being recognized for the hard work you do but this Award is special to us at the CRA. We strive, with our consortium partners, to reach out to those who voices may not always be heard. Our mission includes building and strengthening our diverse community,” says Joan Oliva, Executive Director of the Lake Worth CRA. “On behalf of our Board, Staff and many consortium partners we are thankful for the opportunity to provide much needed housing and jobs in our City and
hope we can continue these efforts for years to come.”
In addition to NBC-LEO, the annual awards are co-sponsored by four other National League of Cities’ (NLC) constituency groups: the Asian Pacific American Municipal Officials (APAMO); the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Local Officials (GLBTLO); the Hispanic Elected Local Officials (HELO); and Women in Municipal Government (WIMG).
Each city was honored at the Celebrate Diversity Breakfast during NLC’s Congressional City Conference in Washington, D.C. The Reverend Al Sharpton, host of MSNBC’s ‘PoliticsNation,’ and Founder of the National Action Network, addressed attendees at the breakfast about the importance of cultural diversity in communities.
For more information about the Lake Worth CRA and its programs, please call the CRA office at (561) 493-2550 or visit www.lakeworthcra.org or www.lakeworthnsp.org.
For more information on the City Cultural Diversity Awards, visit NBC-LEO’s website at
http://www.nlc.org/build-skills-and-networks/networks/constituency-groups/national-black-caucus-oflocal-
elected-officials
The National Black Caucus of Local Elected Officials was established in 1970. A constituency group of the National League of Cities, NBC-LEO advocates for the interests of African-American local elected officials. Its mission is to provide African-American municipal officials and their colleagues with forums to share ideas, discussion groups to develop strategies for improving municipal
governance, debates on policy issues and programs that contribute to the success of America’s cities and towns.
The National League of Cities is dedicated to helping city leaders build better communities. NLC is a resource and advocate for 19,000 cities, towns and villages, representing more than 218 million Americans.

YAHOO! FINANCE

The Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency Successfully Expended More Than 100% of Its $23,237,500 Grant

Press Release: Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency – 15 hours ago.
LAKE WORTH, Fla., Feb. 13, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — The Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency, along with its eighteen Neighborhood Stabilization Program 2 Consortium Partners, is proud to announce that it has successfully expended more than 100% of its $23,237,500 grant within the three year grant period ending February 11, 2013.
While giving its residential Target Area a considerable aesthetic face lift, assuring affordable home ownership and rental opportunities to its beneficiary families, the target area has been relieved of many destabilizing elements to include dilapidated and illegally-partitioned homes, and foreclosed and vacant structures serving as havens for illegal activity.
The Consortium’s efforts lead to hundreds of contracts with local businesses while creating/saving more than two hundred (200) full time equivalent jobs over the grant period. In keeping with requirements to show preferences to low income residents (earning not more than 80% of the Area Median Income) the Consortium expended more than twenty-six percent (26%) of eligible subcontracting dollars with Section 3 businesses and residents, greatly exceeding the HUD goal of ten percent (10%). Additionally, the Consortium provided counseling and training opportunities for interested businesses and residents, resulting in sixteen individuals, including five Section 3 residents receiving certificates in Green Building Techniques from Palm Beach State University.
By the grant end date, the Consortium had rehabilitated or constructed ninety-seven (97) housing units, composed of seventy three (73) homes for sale and twenty four (24) rentals, while acquiring sufficient properties to output and additional fourteen (14) properties over the next couple of years. The grant also was able to provide for much needed City infrastructure including new water, sewer and gas lines and sidewalks where previously none existed.
The CRA’s signature project, the Arts Lofts, is now complete. These for-sale units contain up to 2650 sq ft of livable space which includes a downstairs work studio and an upstairs living area in the heart of downtown Lake Worth.
Further, the Consortium was able to facilitate the upcoming development of a 55-unit affordable, green building rental development, not only to help alleviate the area’s need for safe, affordable rental housing, but to use land which has long been vacant and underutilized property on one of the City’s Gateways. Collectively, the Consortium has removed approximately one hundred (100) foreclosed properties from the County’s backlog, putting as many as one hundred forty two (142) housing units back on the tax rolls, while affecting a total of one hundred sixty six (166) properties, greatly exceeding its goal of one hundred (100) housing units and thirty (30) land banks.
Joan Oliva, (Executive Director) Lake Worth CRA has experienced first-band, the dramatic changes that the City has undergone the past few years. “It is such an honor to work with so many wonderful people, both with our partners and with all these truly deserving new residents. With hard work and an inordinate amount of patience, especially from our partners, we were able to spend all the grant funds, on time, abiding by all the regulations, rules and time frames. I am so thankful for the wonderful main partners we have in Adopt-a-Family, Habitat for Humanity, the City of Lake Worth, Stuart and Shelby, Housing Partnership, Housing Leadership Council, Urban Group and Cannatelli Builders. Without their expertise, guidance and never-give-up attitude, we were able to provide much needed, clean, safe, affordable housing to over 100 families and individuals. I love this City and truly believe we have made a difference in the lives of the citizens who live here and who now call it home.
The City’s rebirth is truly underway with new homes and new homeowners now experiencing the unique and charismatic qualities of this City. Nowhere else can you enjoy an authentic downtown, a newly renovated beach complex, cultural arts and the sense of community that exists in Lake Worth This was an amazing opportunity for us and I am so thankful to those who gave their time, effort and passion and hope we can continue to work together and be the catalyst for more positive change here in the City.”

Although the deadline for expending the grant funds has now passed, all income generated through the sale of units is reinvested into the City of Lake Worth.

Bios of some of the new home owners living out their dream!

Jill Karlin 219 North L Street #100

Jill Karlin is born in Boston, but found her home in Florida in the mid 1980s. A Renaissance woman, Jill is an artist, yoga instructor, cookie maker, and sales woman. Her art works have been shown and are in collections the world over, including an exhibition in New Delhi, India hosted by patron Biki Oberoi and The Oberoi Hotel.

Darryl Sturrup 219 North L Street #110

Darryl Sturrup was born in Florida and raised in Seminole Circle, a housing project in Lantana. He was raised by his mother and began developing a love for music at a very young age. Darryl moved to Canada in his early twenties and recorded his first studio single “Forever” which sold over 10,000 copies. Darryl continues to capture hearts with his song writing capabilities.

Nancy Jack 219 North L Street #104

Ms. Nancy Jack wanted to buy in Lake Worth because she loves Lake Worth’s casual, funky personality and its affordability. Ms. J ack moved here from Los Angeles and found many of the same attributes like – beach, sun and diversity – without the high prices. Lake Worth offers affordable living within walking distance of a beautiful beach, shops and restaurants . Ms. Jack was a writer in L.A. but now practices law in Florida. Ms. Jack states, “Lake Worth helps me keep in touch with my creative side.”

Anthony Reindel 111 Lake Avenue #1

Anthony just recently graduated school in Ohio with a fine arts degree. Mr. Reindel wanted to thank everybody at the Lake Worth CRA for helping to put a roof over his head and giving him the opportunity to own a beautiful home in these tough times”. A gift that is greatly appreciated by him… and his parents.

Jose Diaz 20 South D Street

Mr. Diaz is a Lake Worth local who works as automotive mechanic. He would like to become more involved with his neighborhood association and work closely with his neighbors to decrease crime in the South end of Lake Worth.

For more information or to apply for one of our homes, please contact the CRA by visiting www.lakeworthnsp.org or call

us at 561-493-2550.

Contact:

Joan Oliva

561-493-2550

For Ed Cannatelli, size doesn’t matter. But time sure does. And time has dictated how the second-generation general contractor built his business.

“I’ve been a general contractor my whole life. My dad was a builder, my uncle was,” says 47-year-old Coral Springs resident. After moving to Florida from Connecticut, he started Pompano Beach-based Cannatelli Builders in 2003. “What was unique about the Florida market was there wasn’t a lot of integrity with the companies in place,” Cannatelli says bluntly. “People would be surprised when I showed up on time.”

That punctuality and honesty ¬– “quality work at a fair price” – earned his business a lot of referrals. Cannatelli would do “a couple little jobs for people I knew,” and then get calls from their family and friends. Nine years later, Cannatelli Builders is a fully staffed, fullservice contractor. “We don’t work out of a truck,” Cannatelli says. “We have offices, a field manager, and superintendent. We have weekly job meetings, because clients find it important to be involved.”

And some of those clients have big names: Cannatelli Getting it Done built the Florida Panthers’ Den of Honor at the BB&T Center, a 5,000-square-foot living history of the team with display cases featuring old jerseys, gear, and memorabilia. (That’s about one-third the size of an NHL rink full of team tributes.)

He’s also wrapping up a $3.5 million project in Lake Worth, building 12 townhomes ranging in size from 1,900 to 2,300 square feet as affordable housing for artists. The project is called Urban Arts Lofts and is funded by a federal grant that the city’s community redevelopment agency is using to buy up and renovate or rebuild foreclosures.

But the company still takes on smaller projects, including residential remodels and additions. They also just finished an expansion at Tavalino’s Restaurant in Coral Springs. “We did the bar and entertainment area with alcove-reflected lighting, a lot of LED lighting, and an all-lit onyx bar that’s curved and lit underneath,” Cannatelli says proudly.

One of the company’s draws these days is being what Cannatelli calls “a one-stop shop kind of deal.” And that goes back to Cannatelli’s focus on time.

“Back during the boom, we had a unique experience where the architects would be so busy, and we would wait an extended period of time – and it would kill the job,” Cannatelli explained. “So we brought somebody in-house to do our own revisions and our own drawings.”

That not only sped up the process, it gave clients more control and flexibility to make changes.

“We just opened [in late November] a new showroom next to our facility and have our corporate headquarters, interior design, architecture, and general contracting services under one roof,” Cannatelli says. “A client doesn’t have to go out to find all these things: renderings, 3D drawings where you walk through the house, everything’s here.”

LAKE WORTH

New homes are improving the look of streets in the city’s urban core as the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency and its nonprofit partners make a final push to meet a mid-February deadline for spending $23.2 million in federal grant money.

With less than two months remaining, the CRA and its partners in the Neighborhood Stabilization Program grant have spent $17.8 million, meaning they’ll need to spend another $5.4 million to meet the Feb. 11 deadline.

With another $5.8 million obligated but not technically spent, the grant partners are expected to meet the spending deadline, said Mike McManaman, grant program administrator for the CRA.

“I don’t expect us to lose one dollar,” McManaman said.

Purchases so far include enough abandoned and foreclosed properties to produce 97 dwellings — including 51 single-family homes, nine townhomes, one condo, 12 urban art lofts (townhomes that will be sold to artists at F Street and Lucerne Avenue), nine duplexes (18 dwelling units) and one small apartment complex containing six units.

Another 11 properties will be set aside in a land bank for development within the next 10 years. The CRA also is considering plans to build apartments on a 1.8-acre tract at Sixth Avenue South and F Street that was bought with federal grant money.

So far, 25 homes have been built, sold and delivered to owners. Many were built by Habitat for Humanity, which uses home-buyer and volunteer labor to reduce construction costs.

Volunteers and paid crews are working on another 15 Habitat homes in Lake Worth that are expected to be complete by Jan. 31. They include five, two-story homes on a lot at D Street north of Third Avenue North.

Another grant partner, Adopt-A-Family of the Palm Beaches, expects to complete 41 dwellings by the Feb. 11 deadline, including 24 rental units and 17 homes. Nine of the Adopt-A-Family homes have been sold.

“It’s great to see these new homes with their families moving into our neighborhood,” said Robert Elliott, president of the Tropical Ridge Neighborhood Association. “The pride we can and should have is starting to spread.”

Real estate experts are beginning to see home prices rise in the city’s urban core between A Street and Dixie Highway.

The median sales price for homes in the area increased 13 percent during the past three months, to $50,000, said Steve Schmidt, manager of residential appraisal for the West Palm Beach office of Boyd, Schmidt and Brannum. The average number of days listed properties in the city’s urban core stay on the market has fallen from 104 at the beginning of this year to 85 during the past three months.

But it’s too early to tell whether the uptick in sales prices is related to the dwellings built and refurbished with the federal NSP grant money, said David Chapin, a North Palm Beach real estate appraiser.

“Whenever you put up new homes, it’s going to have a positive effect,” Chapin said. “But you can’t directly attribute increases in values to NSP homes.”

North D Street resident Charles O’Hearn believes new homes built through the federal grant program will eventually improve the value of his home. He can see a new Habitat home diagonally across the street from his house.

But O’Hearn noted that much remains to be done to improve the appeal of his neighborhood, where many small, older homes are used as rental properties. Another house across from O’Hearn’s is abandoned and sagging, a vacancy notice posted on its front door.

Besides improving neighborhoods, the grant-financed homes are providing affordable housing to people who used to be renters.

The Habitat homes are being sold at appraised value to owners who contribute at least 500 hours of “sweat equity” and buy them through Habitat with zero-interest mortgages.

The average sales price for the new Lake Worth homes is about $75,00o, said Bernie Godek, executive director of Habitat for Humanity of Palm Beach County. The average mortgage payment for buyers of the Lake Worth homes, including taxes and insurance, is $450 a month — less than what many were paying in rent, Godek said.